Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
SHOW
News 11
Today 5
( more )
STATION
KGO (ABC) 32
MSNBCW 18
KNTV (NBC) 16
KTVU (FOX) 16
CSPAN 14
KPIX (CBS) 14
ALJAZAM 11
CNNW 11
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 11
KOFY 7
FBC 5
KICU 5
WJLA (ABC) 5
WRC (NBC) 5
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 222
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 226 (some duplicates have been removed)
icon as news spread of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this friday morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars. yet, his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> in other news this day, much of the u.s. bracing for a major winter storm with snow, ice, and plunging temperatures. "early today" starts right now. 45 4556>>> good morning to you. i'm richard lui. he is known for changing the world. people around the globe mourning the loss of nelson mandela. from a small prison cell he empowered a nation. his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tireless struggle for freedom gave him the respect of the world. >> his journey to president embody the promise that human beings ask countries can change for the better. >> we should have the same type of spirit and caring of the people and as a nation. >> we
to our producer and said what is the subject of today's show? [ applause ] and she said nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show. and he goes, oh, all right. >> she credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportationing order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the streets of benghazi. despite threats. he chose to stay and teach high school chemistry. his wife and so
women and children. in the end, the police massacre at sharpville killed 69 people. at the time, nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robi
killed 69 people. at the time, nelson mandella was in his early 40s. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid has been nonviolent organizing. they decided maybe that wasn't enough and nelson mandella was one of the leaders who went underground to help start it. they would try to sabotage the state. they banned the amc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandella was arrested for treason in 1961. in 1962, he was convicted of traveling illegally. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. they convicted him and sentenced him to life on robin island. he began a new sentence that was a life sentence. and for the first 18 years of it, his cell had no bed, no plumbing of ne kind. he was permitted one visitor per year for 30 minutes. he became a symbol, worldwide, of the fight to stop apartheid. the south african government would not allow a picture of him to be taken in prison for decades. so the image was always him when he had been locked away. he served 27
:00. are celebrating nelson mandela in the streets of south africa and across the globe. special coverage tonight including our conversation with former president clinton. >>> also this evening, the dangerous storm heading across a huge part of our country. tens of millions of americans in its path and another right behind it. >>> great expectations. after a surge in jobs, unemployment drops to its lowest level in five years. a work in progress, but can it be sustained? >>> and once in a lifetime. mandela's visit to this country. those who were there reflect on the power of that moment in time. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. in london last night they chose to wait until the end of the premiere of the film "long walk to freedom," the story of nelson mandela, before breaking the news to the audience that nelson mandela had died. it brought a stunned reaction from the crowd which included prince william and his wife kate. the evening had been hosted by two of nelson mandela's daughters. and while the entire world knew this day was coming and the life of this 95-year-old man has come to
and be guided by the prepared to die for >> nelson mandela's family share their grief as the world mourns. president obama and the first lady will travel to south africa for nelson mandela's memorial service next week. >> hello, welcome no al jazeera america, i'm morgan radford live from new york city. reinforcements on the town in trying to end the violence. nearly 400 people have been killed in the fighting in the past three days. france is dispatching more than 1,000 troops and the african union plans to double its forces. 10,000 have fled the capital. officials ordered everyone off the streets of bangui. for the latest on the crisis we start in bangui. a warning - you may find some of these images disturbing. >> french soldiers on food patrol in bangui. this is new to the city and welcomeded by men. they are here to reassure people enough to open up shops. at the moment there's no food or medicine. there's little the french can do about the growing sectarian violence between muslims and christians. >> translation: we muslims have been here for 200 years. they are killing us every day.
, including many women and irn ch. in the end, it killed 69 people. at the time nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life
nelson mandela. >> nelson mandela closed a statement from the dock saying, "i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal i hope to live for and to achieve. but if need be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die." nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today, he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. .e no longer belongs to us he belongs to the ages. dignity andfierce unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from imprisonment to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example that all of huma
today we learned of the death of nelson mandela, the man who lead south africa from apartheid to a multiracial democracy. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> pelley: from johannesburg. an american is gunned down in benghazi, libya. was it terrorism, bob orr is covering. snow, ice and bitter cold stretch across half the nation. manual bojorquez on what it is hitting and where it is going. and the special bond between two presidents. we'll talk to bill clinton about his friend nelson mandela. >> we could have had the politics of resentment. he chose the politics of inclusion. se the politics of captioning sponsored by cbs ptioning sponsored this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. with s >> pelley: good evening. he changed the world. you can't say that about many people. but you can say that about nelson mandela. the man who lead south africa's peaceful transition out of apartheid and became the country's first black president. he died today at the age of 95. mandela had been battling a lung infection for many months. right after its official annou
>> announcer: the >>> the death of nelson >>> the death of nelson mandela. this is nbc nightly news with brian williams. we're back with more of our special coverage of the passing of nelson mandela who died today at the age of 95. as you might imagine, at this hour, reaction to his loss, is pouring in from around the world and the nation of south africa now begins a state of mourning. our south african-based correspondent is with us from outside the mandela family home in johannesburg. as we said in our first half hour, this is a nation many of whom went to bed last night who will be waking up tomorrow morning to hear this anticipated but still sad and shocking news. >> absolutely right, brian. anticipated. expected. predictable but painful nonetheless. as i look around, the crowds here have grown to maybe 400 or 500 people. mainly south africans who were born after the birth of democracy. the so-called born frees who have no memory of the darkest years of ar par tide. they are singing and celebrating his life rather than mourning his death because, of course, his death was not in
1994 when nelson mandela delivered a first address as president of south africa. now an opportunity for them to learn about the democracy path that was born at that time. >> the first step on this side, that side - it's got an emblem. the president sits there alone. this is where he has his own place. >> from the tour guide an anecdote demonstrating that the great can get it wrong. >> the former president was making is a speech in this house. once he was making a speech he noted a red button flicking next to him. he wanted to know what was going on. he had to stop and find out as to what was really going on. he was told, "mr president, you don't have to worry. no one is in danger. the reason that red light goes on is because you should have finished speaking a long time ago." >> underlying the better life that nelson mandela made. >> i think it is a big thing for me, that nobody would have done for me. >> i think he played a role, especially for the young people of today. he made a sacrifice for where we are today. there's a lot of opportunities that came from what - from the decisi
of nelson mandela makes its first statement since his death as the memorial grows for the antiapartheid leader. power outages and a travel nightmare. wintry weather spreads across the u.s. >> tonight a u.s. veteran is home with his family after being held in north korea for more than a month. merrill newman arrived in the 85-year-old was accused of committing crimes while he served in the korean war. his family called merrill newman's time in north korean's hands, "a very difficult ord eel", >> melissa chan has the story. >> when merrill newman made the trip, he would not have known how difficult it would turn out. after weeks of detention he's in the u.s., looking healthy, with his wife by his side and a simple message. >> it's been a great homecoming, and i'm tired, but happy to be with my family now. thank you all for the support. very much appreciated. >> merrill newman was a soldier in a korean war. his visit to pyongyang was a long-planned vacation down memory lain. he was no ordinarily soldier. the north koreans released this concession video, likely forced by newman, admitting h
the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. i got to tell you, being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socio-economic levels, they're talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half-hour. >>> another major headline this morning, the investigation into the shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wife and son returned to the u.s. for the holidays. he was set to join them next week. >>> a wicked storm slamming the nation this morning is far from over. a treacherous mix of snow and sleet crippling the south central u.s., blanketing arkansas, oklahoma and tennessee. here's abc's clayton sandell. >> reporter: temperatur
are remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed this world. president obama saying just hours ago he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. at 95, his death not a surprise, but the lessons of his life still reverbrating around the globe, that long walk to freedom, brimming with humility, resilient, a determination to forgive. and there has been a huge outpouring of emotion, reaction from around the world tonight, our team there starting with abc's chief foreign correspondent terry moran who joins us right now from london. terry? >> reporter: it is a profound moment for south africa and really for the world, the marking of the passing of this remarkable man and of the end of an era in human grace and dignity. in south africa itself, in the neighborhood which was a segregated township where nelson mandela lived before he went to prison for 27 years and where he went home to. there is a combination of mourning, of sorrow and celebration and gratitude, people gathering outside of his home and dancing, celebrating the life of nelson mandela. reaction pouring in from around the world for h
. i am tom keene. it is a busy day. nelson mandela is front and center. data.ot of economic today is job stay. the moment is 8:30 a.m.. theine: 55, we get university of michigan confidence. also, we have american eagle outfitters out before the bell. alan greenspan will speak. he called it a bubble. bitcoin made aon splash. next year'sraw for soccer world cup will take place in brazil. it will determine the competition at the tournament. this is a big deal. >> that is more foreign than the jobs report, actually. >> state tuned. current, commodities, stocks, bonds -- we're nearing 1800 and the futures. yields go out. the dollar is stronger, con founding germany. they won a weaker euro and they do not get it. -- this is aond big deal. underer chinese currency, is at australian dollar .91. we scoured the papers. so much is going on this morning. all of it is centered on the passing of nelson mandela. >> he is the front page story. today is job stay. the results of the survey say that payrolls have increased in the month of november. >> the feeling is like this? >> it will probably de
edition of "andrea mitchell reports," celebrating the life of nelson mandela. >> i stand here before you not as a profit but as humble servant of you, the people. >> a giant among then, activist, prisoner, leader, a president, a founding father. for the legions who revered him simple madiba. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. >> my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> by the power of his example demonstrated unequivocally how each of us can choorse, how we will respond injustices, grievances, sorrows and tragedies that afflict all of human kind. >> he was an inspiration to generations of freedom fighters. >> we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you. you inspired us. i said new york city, mr. mandela, you inspired us. >> we entered into a covenant, which i billed to society in which all, both black and white, will be able to walk tall w
are mourning the loss of nelson mandela. and washington dc, people gathered with candles outside the embassy where a statue of mandela stands. >> it is now morning in south africa. some people have been paying tribute outside his home since his death was announced late thursday night. others are just waking up the to the news there. mandela is credited with transforming a country. >> tonight, danielle nottingham has more on the passing of this great leader. >> reporter: south africans gathered in the predawn darkness to sing the praises of their former president, nelson mandela who died just hours earlier at the age of 95. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison for crimes against the government, mandela was freed in 1990. in 1994, he became the country's first black president. >> he built a genuine multiracial democracy in south africa. when he could have had a one party state and shut everyone else out. when he could have had the politics of resentment, he chose the politics of inclusion. >> reporter: years later, he bec
, nelson mandela i hope that as many members as possible will be able to contribute. contributions will continue until 10:00 p.m.. the house will also wish to know that there will be an event to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of nelson mandela taking place in westminster hall on thursday the 12th of december. >> thank you, mr. speaker. >> nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime. we are here to celebrate his character, his achievements, and his legacy. condolence books have been organized. tos evening we will fly south africa to attend the service and johannesburg. and his royal highness, the prince of wales, will be there for the funeral. his family, his friends, and the millions in south africa, and those around the world, our morning and today. mourning him today. though humanity bears ever upwards, away from brutality. but it is not so. progress is not just handed down. it is one through struggle -- struggle.h nelson mandela was the embodiment of that struggle. the evil ofr forget apartheid and its affect. separate buses, separate schools, and e
. >>> south african mourners are holding vigils and memorials for nelson mandela continues. and this marijuana ingredient is bringing hundreds of families with epileptic children to colorado. >> we'll start with the legacy of nelson mandela. >> part of successful white government that kept nelson mandela in jail and then served for mandela. as u.s. ambassador and then foreign minister it was his task to defend the continued imprisonment of nelson mandela and other political opponent. but privately he long lobbied for mandela's release. >> i submitted a memorandum, due to the effect that mr. mandela ought to be released that we're bringing a bigger martyr of him every day he stays in prison, and that his international aclaim and status would be growing to an extent that we would not be able to hand it will any more. unfortunately, it continued on. >> here we have a man 27 years in prison. the day he was released he displayed the acumen and attitude of an american who has been a president before. amazing. amazing what insight he had into the minds of people. and for that matter into world affair
and bitter battle against apartheid. streets tonight have been a place of celebration for the life of nelson mandela. much more on that in a few moments. >>> but our top story tonight comes from california, where an 85-year-old american man is home after a seven-week ordeal as a prisoner in north korea. the end of a tense standoff came suddenly, the north korean government saying merrill newman, a korean war vet with a heart condition was released for humanitarian reasons. nbc's mike taibbi is in palo alto with more for us. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. the north korean officers say they deported merrill newman, others say he was freed after a detention that never should have happened. bottom line, the 85-year-old the ex-marine for a trip that lasted much longer than it should have is home. it happened quickly without any prior announcement, the flight from pyongyang to beijing, and merrill newman finally able to speak freely. >> i'm very glad to be on my way home. >> reporter: and then after a direct flight to san francisco, american soil. >> it's been a great, great home
today at nelson mandela's long journey. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. we further explore mandela's legacy. tonight, how south africa was forever changed by the man they called "father." >> to many people nelson mandela does represent the kind of more all center an a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. >> woodruff: back in the u.s., paul solman digs into today's jobs report, which points to strong gains in hiring and a five-year low in the unemployment rate. and mark shields and david brooks are here. they reflect on mandela's life and the rest of the week's news. those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made
run down. we will honor and remember the life of former south african president, nelson mandela. his death was not a surprise. he was in failing health for months since being admitted to the hospital six months ago. he is being laid to rest a week from sunday and today people are remembering him as a giant among men. one of the greatest heroes. he was a man in the mold of gandhi and martin luther king. a revolutionary who spent nearly a third of his life behind bars so his country would be free. flags have been lowered to half-staff in washington and all over the country. reaction has poured in from all corners from global leaders to activists to ordinary men and women remembering nelson mandela. >> our nation has lot of its greatest son. our people have lot of a father. >> let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the ark of the moral universe towards justice. >> thank you for the gift. >> what an extroerdary and inspiring man else in an mandela was. >> going from being in prison on the list of many nations and b
time to come. >> south africa beginnings a week of ser -- ceremonies honouring nelson mandela. crowds left flowers, photographs and balloons outside nelson mandela's home in johannesburg. a memorial service will be held on tuesday with president obama, george w. bush, and jimmy carter. the man defending nelson mandela's yisent is also speaking out. mike hanna sat with him to talk about the unique relationship. >> there was an excessive part of the government that get-nelson mandela in gaol, and he served under nelson mandela in the first democratic cabinet. as u.n. ambassador and foreign minister, it was his task to publicly defend the yisent of nelson mandela and other political opponents. privately he maintains he lobbied for nelson mandela's release. >> in 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department. and to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we were making a bigger martyr of you every day stays in prison. that is international. and status. would be growing to an extent where he would not be able to handle it. eight years later nelson mandela became a
and the world is saying good-bye to nelson mandela and my conversation with maya angelou and gary player about the power to inspire people to imagine a better world and make it real. and later, you'll meet a man who spent 18 years in prison and came close to being executed for a murder he didn't commit despite evidence he didn't do it. >>> we begin tonight with breaking news of freakish and dangerous weather pattern that made it possible to experience a 105 degree swing from miami where it was 80 to montana where it was minus five. super cold rain is falling, freezing and coating a big chunk of the country in misery and y mayham. >> reporter: two days ago here in arkansas, the state was reaching near record high temperatures, 75 degrees on wednesday. today, try 26 and a dangerous layer of ice coating the roads, cars spun out and power lines weighed down with the frozen rain. >> the biggest problem we got right now, no traffic on the road. therefore no traffic when we put the salt and sand down, sleet come down and sit on top of it and sit there, and until there's really stop, i don't think w
their own sort of memories of nelson mandela. we'll have more on this on "morning joe" which starts right now. ♪ ordinary love >> i build a society in which all both black and white can walk tall without any fear in their hearts. assured of their right to human dignity, a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> it would have been groundbreaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but nelson mandela was so much more. not only to his own country but to people the world over. the freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba, as he was known, sacrificed 25 years of his life in prison so that his countrymen might be free from the bonds of apartheid. >> your tireless and heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. i, therefore, place in the remaining years of my life in your hands. >> when he was released from prison he was greeted by a crowd black and white and his plight inspired a young college student who would change history himself. >> i'm one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very fir
baldwin. the news is now. as the world mourns an icon, washington didn't always see nelson mandela as a saint. >>> america's unemployment rate drops, but will conservatives give president obama credit? >>> plus -- ♪ whiskey river >> willie nelson pugglled out oa gig at sea world after cnn's explosive film on killer whales. >> and when twitter bikes and critics sting. carrie underwood's version of a classic hits a nerve. >>> we have a lot to talk about here on this friday. i'm brooke baldwin. thank you so much for joining me. let's begin with this dangerous and deadly winter storm affecting millions of you all across the nation today. this freezing storm hitting from texas, all the way up to new york, you see the map here. the system causing flight cancellations, dangerous driving conditions, and now deaths. three adults have died in car accidents in both oklahoma and texas as a result of this storm system that you're looking at here. and in arkansas, one man died after a tree fell on his camper during the freezing rain. you know, ice can bring down the tree limbs and power lines
and the world reacts to the passing of nelson mandela. >> she is trying to sign up for obamacare but the web site won't let her saying her husband is in jail. one problem. that's not true. what the government is asking her to do now. >> they are scaring sense into middle schoolers who are out of control. >> you could hit somebody. you think it is freaking funny. ? >> now police are the ones in it trouble. fox friends first starts right now. -- "fox & friends first" starts right now. >> let's get right to the fox news alert for you. the world mourning the death of former south african president nelson mandela. here's a look at live pictures from outside his home. earlier hundreds of people sang gospel songs paying tribute to the leader who inspired the world to hope. ♪ >> jonathan hunt takes a look back at nelson mandela's extraordinary life. >> when nelson mandela walked free from prison on february the 11th, 1990, he knew as did the rest of the world, that white domination in south africa was about to end. he fought apartheid since the introduction in south africa in 1948 campaigning peac
blazers, taking different approaches to change their industry and the world. nelson mandela certainly changing the world, the legacy he left the hide. plus, ted williams, known as " the kid" and "the splendid splinter" one of baseball's all-time greats. and the kid who may become the next warren buffett. all of that and more over the next hour. first, let's go to the headlines from our radio cohost carol massar. a five-&p 500 snapping day slide, gaining more than one percent, after better than expected u.s. jobs reports. dropped toyment rate a five-year low, payroll with 203,000 jobs added. sears is looking to spin off its lands end unit which has remained profitable despite the company struggles. and there was much glitz and glamour for today's world cup draw. rizzo will faced mexico, -- brazil will face mexico, cameroon, and portugal. those are some of the top headlines. massar. you, carol the world mourns the loss of one of its great leaders. nelson mandela emerged from 27 years in prison to become south africa's first elected black president, dying yesterday at the age of 95. the
. we have a look at nelson mandela through their eyes. >> reporter: we spoke with barbara lee. she says the bay area holds a special connection for him because of the leadership and the people here who fight for human rights and against apartheid in south africa. he stood smiling in front of a crowd of about 60,000 people packed into the oakland coliseum. this was 1990, and the bay area was the last stop in the u.s. tour for north america. he once led the effo-- >> it was an amazing moment. he came to say thank you. he came to talk about freeing south africa and what he was going to do. it was quite a special moment for the bay area. >> reporter: here in oakland, a street was named after him, mandela parkway. he received the nobel peace prize. he was on a terrorist watch list since the 1970s. legislation passed into 2008. the congresswoman said his passing reaffirms the passion she has to continue fighting for what she believes is right. >> it reminds us don't get weary and tired. keep fighting for what's right. >> reporter: she had the privilege of meeting mandela several times, descri
, nelson mandela. he died today at his home after a long illness. he was 95. good evening, i'm elizabeth cook. >> and i'm ken bastida. the crowd is still outside nelson mandela's house. this video was taken a few minutes ago. people have been chanting, singing, and dancing all through the night. it has not stopped. it was mandela who transformed the country into what it is today. martin luther king, jr., had a dream. some say nelson mandela dreamed it. he became one of the greatest civil rights icons of the last 50 years and it cost him almost three decades of his life in a jail cell. vanita on the man who earned the admiration of millions. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> after 27 years in prison, nelson mandela walked into freedom. against all odds, the leader of a rebellion became the leader of national unity. mandela's decade-long rebellion turned him into a freedom fighter, an international hero. >> i fought against white domination. i have fought for every family. >> mandela was born into a privileged family. he supported no
of nelson mandela with the cbs evening news. >> he was born july 18, 1918. his mother gave him a name meaning "troublemaker," but later a school teacher named him nelson. he moved to johannesburg at 23. he became one of the nation's first black lawyers and joined the opposition african national congress in the early 1940's, devoting himself to peacefully ending apartheid. then in 1960, peaceful black demonstrators were killed by white south african police in the infamous massacre. mandela came to believe then that the only recourse was violence. >> it is futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks on an unarmed and defenseless people. >> he was arrested and sentenced to life for sabotage and conspiracy. he served most of his life on robben island, the alcatraz of south africa. a fellow prisoner said mandela never let his spirit die. >> he accepted that he may not live to see the victory. but he did not doubt that the freedom struggle would triumph. >> mandela was imprisoned for 27 years. on february 11, 1990, at the a
the continuing coverage of the death of nelson mandela, people around the globe are paying tribute as south africa prepares for more than a week of funeral events. [chanting] >> the crowds have gathered outside his home in johannesburg and set up a huge makeshift memorial there. singing and dancing and crying for south africa's first blackt. nelson mandela died yesterday in that home. he was 95. doctors say he had long battled a lung infection. front pages reflect how important he was to people outside of south africa. hours ago the country's current president announced plans for the funeral. including a national day of prayer and re flexion on sunday -- reflection on sunday, and official memorial service on tuesday at the soccer stadium. the body is to lie in state, at government buildings, and a funeral service is set for sunday, december 15th, a week from this sunday, and mandela's childhood village in a rural part of eastern south africa. analysts say the funeral will be one of the largest ever of its kind, and they're expecting all living and able united states presidents to attend. th
:00. >>> there is mr. nelson mandela a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> south africa and the world mourns the loss of a hero and an icon. nelson mandela was 95. he spent decades fighting apartheid in his native south africa. >> i'm anne makovec live in the newsroom. as the world remembers mandela, we here in the bay area remember his-historic visit to the east bay and congressional legislation and divesting in south africa. >> reporter: bundle up. it is still cold out here. i'm kiet do. we have a live report. >>> yeah, freezing temperatures again around the bay area. freeze warnings are up. what a chilly day. this is the third day in a row of freezing temperatures showing up outside. some of those numbers dropping off under clear skies this morning into the 20s and 30s. now 23 in santa rosa. 28 in concord. 39 in san francisco. and 30 degrees in livermore. so a very cold start to the day again freeze warnings until 9:00. then clouds roll in in the middle of the day. plan on highs only in the 40s and 50s. this afternoon we could see a little rain. and then tonight, cold
>> remembering nelson mandela, the revered south african leader is being mounted in the bay area and around the world. we are learning new details of the ten day mourn period underway. >> breaking news, half a dozen people are out of their homes after an early morning fire. who is reaching out to help them. >> thank you for joining us at 6:00. i am kristen sze. >> i am eric thomas. >> we have a light at the end of the tunnel, no quit so cold as it was, two to five degrees warmer around the bay and one or two in the east bay, but, city, chilly in the north bay at zero to three degrees cooler than yesterday with 22 in napa and 25 in novato and the upper 20's around concord and san ramon and 30 in antioch and livermore and the mid-to-upper 30's from san jose up both bay shorelines to oakland and 42 in san francisco and freezing cold at 32 in half moon bay. from our tower you can see how clean it is and the next 12 hours, 22 to 39 under sun, and 46 to 50 at noon, and high clouds roll in at 4:00, and 46 to 52 and get ready for lit hours during the early evening with temperatures in th
south african leader nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. we have a team of cnbc reporters and experts joining us this evening. my pal and colleague tyler matheson, hampton pierceson, john harwood are with us but i want to begin with chris bishop, live outside mandela's home. you see the scene. people gathering to celebrate his life. chris, can you describe what's going on and what is the feeling, what is the basic sense there? >> reporter: well, what's happening at the moment, the police have actually, there are so many people around, the police have closed off the roads around nelson mandela's home in johannesburg where he passed away this evening. but there are people there, there are people with flags, people are crying, people are coming to sing and a bit further away at nelson mandela's former home in soweto, where he lived when he was a young lawyer in the 1950s and early 1960s, when he went on the ground, there were people gathering there, singing songs, celebrating his life. some people are crying and some people are consoling each other. it really is a celebration
. and many on the right just can't handle it. here's what i'm talking about. >> well, nelson mandela stood up against a great injustice and was willing to pay a huge price for that. that's the reason he's mourned today because of that struggle he performed. but you're right. what he was advocating for was not necessarily the right answer, but he was fighting against some great injustice. and i would make the argument that, you know, we have a great injustice going on in this country with an ever-increasing size of government that is taking over and controlling people's lives. and obama care is front and center in that. >> yes. he just compared fighting the health care law to fighting apartheid. rick santorum doesn't have to like the health care law, but he's a former u.s. senator. does he really think it compares to government-backed racial segregation. but this is the ugliest we've seen from comparing the law that saves lives to hurricane katrina to saying the law was terrorizing the country. and now senator shutdown is also freaking out. >> we were talking a few minutes ago about obama care
to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. >> nelson mandela long walk to freedom took him right through the united states capitol. at the start of this saturday in december with much of the country locked in a deep freeze. we are thawing out this morning with questions ability some of the new things we've discovered. did you know as recently as five years ago, nelson mandela needed a special waiver just to travel in the united states. we're going to talk about why that was and why it took so long for that not to be the case anymore. there are also always things we know this week, from the wide ranging conversation with president obama, his frustration and disappointment with congress, hills hope in the young people, political leaders of the future. we will talk about that later. progressive leaders are pushing back, fighting back against voices that want them to give in on things like cutting social security and medicare. there is no mistaking that this week. finally, we want everyone to know our weekly current events quiz show "up against the clock," moving to the sec
nation has departed. our nation has lost it's greatest son. >> nelson mandela died today at age 95. his family was by his side. the announcement came from south africa's president. his struggle against apartheid made him a global symbol of human rights. good afternoon, everybody, i'm larry beil. he died of complications from a recurring lung infection. we have a look back at the legacy. >> born in 1918, nelson mandela was the son of a tribal chief. he was living under apartheid that led to oppression of the majority. black south africans mandela made the fight for his country his cause. in 1964 he paid the price with freedom, sentenced to life in prison. >> i have cherished the idea of a democratic and free society. for which i am prepared to die. >> with mandela in chains south africans found a new rallying cry. free mandela came synonymous with demands for a free south africa. the president declerk released mandela. in the name of peace. >> he was embraced by his people and the world and became a nobel peace prize recipient and was elected president in the first free election. a triu
at the table, eight political parties, the british, irish governments negotiating this. how did nelson mandela become involved in 1997? >> well, i made very good friends with chief negotiator, and because i was in south africa for a number of years documenting the transition from apartheid to a free south afri africa. i was also working in northern ireland, where i worked all my life. and i noticed there were similarities i in the behaviorsf northern ireland negotiators and south african negotiators. so in a process of going back and forth i convinced the northern irish negotiators from every side that they could learn something from the south africans and i had them come to thireland with me. sit with the parties of northern ireland for three hours each. and they came back and said, i think we can do something here. and they said, we'll do something when each of the persons who are coming here writes to me and asks for our assistance because we do not interfere in the affairs of other countries. it fell to me to gather those 16 letters, which in due course i delivered, and it took place in ar
for what promises to be a truly epic memorial for nelson mandela. we will be live which details. first, let's go to kate which this top story. >> we will be checking in which you. let's gen here back at home which a massive winter storm, icing the east coast, air travel is an absolute nightmare. more than 1,100 flights already scrubbed today following 2,100 flights cancelled on sunday. if that's not good, people have been forced to sleep on cots at the airport a. highway nightmare from wisconsin to maryland. hundreds of wrecks. dozens deadly. we have this storm covered beginning which meteorologist indra petersen. how is it looking now? >> no stranger to travel delays. ten hours i was stuck last week on the tarmac. i know i was not alone. this storm wreaked havoc which freezing rain, rain itself and snow and ice across a huge chunk of the country. snow, freezing rain and dangerous ice. >> oh! oh my god. >> reporter: in plano, texas, people caught cascades of ice shooting down from rooftops. >> oh my god. >> reporter: another storm is wreaking havoc across much of the nation t. frej id storm
in an extraordinary way. i conclude by simply saying that when we pay tribute to nelson mandela, as we rightly do, we should pay tribute to him for what he stood for and we should acknowledge what he achieved in south africa, but we should also recognise what he taught the world about the resolution of what seemed like intractable political problems through patience, personality, courage, and diplomacy. military solutions and armed struggle are sometimes unavoidable, but often they are avoidable and he demonstrated that better than anyone in our time. >> mr. peter hain. >> i thank the prime minister, the deputy prime minister and the leader of the opposition for their perhaps over-generous remarks about my role. let me simply underline that there were many tens of thousands of activists in the anti-apartheid movement who deserve to be acknowledged as well. thank you, mr. speaker, for your personal leadership in ensuring that this tribute debate is such a special event, as you said, for such a special person. i note that you are wearing the south african tie on this occasion. i specifically thank you
africa. a crowd gathered outside of nelson mandel' home. some have put on the south african flag during this remembrance. >> the impact on his country cannot be overstated nor can the legacy he leaves behind for the world and bay area. >> dan, nelson mandela felt he had a true connection with san francisco and the bay area. and you're right. others would follow. it was called celebration sunday. 58,000,000 packed to see, and hear nelson mandela. he came to the bay area with a message of thanks and hope. people of oakland and bay area have given me and and hope to continue the struggle. >> that was a moment of sheer joy. for the community and i think the coliseum was full, every seat standing room only. state senator was one of these on stage that day. now, the executive director of the training center which trains minorities and women for jobs in construction. >> beautiful person and lived life to the fullest. >> the east bay was at the fore front of the movement in the u.s. students pushing for investment. and long shoremen refused to unload south african goods. before protests, parish
the world mourning the loss of an icon. reaction to the passing of nelson mandela. >> also the president admitted he misled the american people, but something dddn't -- somebody, that is to say, didn't get the memo. >> i still go back and say what i said earlier. what he said was true. >> okay. >> if you want to keep the insurance you have, you can keep it. >> more from harry reid moments away. >> a woman catches a peeping tom in a dressing room and chases him through a store. one problem? she forgot to put her shirt back on. >> i was that woman. no. >> queue the animation. it is friday's show, and "fox & friends" starts now. ♪ ♪ >> it's "fox & friends." >> welcome aboard studio e. today is one of those days where officially this weekend they are going to welcome the christmas season to stanford, connecticut, and as has been the case for the last number of years, that means it's going to be the repelling of the landmark building, stanford's connecticut tallest building, 22 stories high. santa rappelles down the side with rick wright. he will be here live this morning. >> it might be
on on. >> maybe he was trusting his lieutenants. we had former senator bill nelson who said early on they were warning, mr. president, if you want -- that is after the fact they were sending a message, don't keep saying that. and the didn't know whether that was directly conveyed to the white house. >> the problem here is the white house has been on the wanted the bill passed. doesn't care what happens. enough it's not go so well. let me tell you, it's his inexperience at handling crisis. you don't call up people and have them come in the oval office? she should have been there every week. >> the phone thing would also be -- >> the phone -- if i callow, that's right going to show. >> phone records are there, too, but the fact is, the president would want to meet with you. the president would want to look you in the eye and say, what are you doing? what is wrong? bring your people over. i'm getting killed by this. the president is strangely disengaged. not only on this, on other issues andow yao get back to my point about chauncey gardner. when this is a disengaged president whose
. >>> we have some sad news out of south africa at this time. >> let's go to a special report about nelson mandela. >> ten minutes to 9:00, three hours ago, a great deal of activity over the past few hours. family members reported here. some reports of a priest arri arriving earlier today. yet, there was so much confusion. two of his daughters are in london tonight at a film premier. the premier, the royal premier of the movie about the life of nelson mandela's long walk to freedom. in the last few minutes, the president of south africa went on television and addressed the nation. it's incredibly late. most people will hear this news when they wake up in the morning. he broke the news and broke the hearts of millions and millions of south africans here. he's the father of the nation. he's the man who made modern south africa and gave 27 years of his life in prison. much of it spent on robin island. he is the icon, he is the man who symbolizes the transition from repression, racial segregation to democracy here. he is more than a father to this nation. he really em bodies the entire spirit
. a second storm is forming right now. we're live with the forecast. and beyond borders, how nelson mandela influenced civil rights leaders here and his complicated relationship with the united states. >>> also at this hour, on the record right now, president obama is wrapping up remarks about israel during a time of tension over iran. these are some live pictures. the president literally just wrapping up. more from the white house. >>> and the budget breakthrough, a rare bipartisan plan is in the works right now. i'll ask a gop congresswoman if they'll make deadline day. >>> there will be a lot of friendships made and other kids will have a friend to play with. >> and the buddy bench. one second-grader's idea to solve loneliness is today's big idea. a lot to get to. >>> we start this hour with the release of 85-year-old american veteran merrill newman. newman arrived at san francisco international airport about two hours ago to applause. he was holding his wife's hand. the north korean government released newman late last night. they'd been holding him in the country since october. as you
.s. flags ordered to half-staff until tomorrow in honor of nelson mandela. it was lowered in a police station in south carolina, but it had nothing to do with man l mande mandela. instead it was for a deputy killed in the line of duty and in remembrance of pearl harbor. today the flag is flying at full staff and in direct defiance of the president. he explained why he refused? a shoaf sign of respect to what nelson mandela has done, and i have no problem for them lowering it in south africa, but in our country, it's for the people that sacrificed for our country. >> he faces no legal action and he's grateful that he can disagree with the president without fearing a reprimand. >>> a newlywed couple is accused of killing a man simply for the thrill of it. that's when police are saying about this young couple. they were married just three weeks at the time of the alleged krim. the details are horrific. alexandra field is on the story northwest of philadelphia. what are you learning? >>. >> reporter: deb, elytte barbour are telling police he and his new wife wanted to kill, they had made
. >>> a crowd is going to stay for the official service for nelson mandela. johannesburg, area national day of prayer. members of all faith honored the former president. meanwhile a steady flow of mourners stopped by his home in suburban johannesburg. more now from al jazeera's nick schiff rin. >> nelson mandela always talked about a rainbow nation on behalf of all south africans who were segregated by racist rulers. nelson mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. at afternoon interfaith service searchesouth africans celebratee unity that nelson mandela provided them. down the road at an indian rally, perusha thanked him for the difference for her children. >> basically madiba made the change. we were basically part of the deprived lot. we had to use only the baths for indian people. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we go out in the evening the buy something to eat and we have to say to the guy, sorry do you serve, and you're more than welcome to buy take aways. >> they have no idea what their parents suffered for them w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 226 (some duplicates have been removed)